Wing Luke doll

Dublin Core

Title

Wing Luke doll

Subject

Dolls for Democracy

Description

Portrait doll of Wing Luke, young Chinese male, painted head wshort black artificial hair glued to head- wears a grey flannel wool
suit, white shirt, tie- doesn't stand up, on a wire stand that doesn't
work- black leather shoes, no nails. Wing Luke was a young,
popular, 1960's WA State representative who tragically was killed
in a plane crash.
Wing Chong Luke (1925-1965) was the first Asian American to
hold elected office in the State of Washington. Only half way
through his senior year, Luke was inducted into the Army. Initially
in the Army Specialized Training Program, he then joined the
infantry and field artillery and was acting first sergeant and
regimental S-1 sergeant in the 40th division Field Artillery. He
served in Guam, Korea, New Guinea, New Britain and the
Philippines where he received the Bronze Star. Initially in private
practice, he soon was appointed the Assistant Attorney General of
the State of Washington, in the Civil Rights Division and served in
that capacity from 1957-1962. In December, 1961 Luke took a
leave of absence from his duties to file for position number 5 on
the Seattle City Council, which he won, and was sworn in on
March 13, 1962, when he became the first Asian American to hold
elected office in the Pacific Northwest. Believing that the culture
and traditions of Chinese and other Asian immigrants should be
preserved and taught, Luke envisioned a place to present the
history and important issues of Asian Americans. The Wing Luke
Asian Museum in Seattle's International District was founded to
fulfill that vision.

Creator

Cecil (Ruth Bullard) Weeks

Source

Independence, MO

Date

1960 - 1969

Contributor

restorer- Lisa Pepin

Rights

Storage

Format

Dolls

Type

Portrait

Identifier

2007.001.018

Files

https://www.washingtonjewishmuseum.org/artifacts/Wing-Luke.jpg

Collection

Citation

Cecil (Ruth Bullard) Weeks, “Wing Luke doll,” Washington Jewish Museum Collection, accessed May 24, 2018, https://collection.washingtonjewishmuseum.org/items/show/39.